Back in the Dough

Tues June 9, 4 to 8 pm: Get your bread crusty and fresh!
Wed June 10, 9 and 9:30 am: Bread delivered in Quesnel to Green Tree Health & Wellness and Bouchie Lake Country Store
Wed June 10, 4 to 8 pm: Pizza night(mare) returns! Come early, it may be busy.
Sat June 13, 8:30 am until we sell out: Quesnel Farmer’s Market

Tim and I are happy to be home, and the lovely warm summer weather helps! We are basking in the sunshine and enjoying the transformation of our yard from winter-wonderland when we left, to green and lush currently. We were especially happy to go to the Quesnel Farmer’s Market on Saturday – with bread we baked a mere 48 hours after getting home! Sometimes you just have to stare jet lag in the face and not back down. The Quesnel Farmer’s Market is such a great venue and it is so nice to see all our friends from Quesnel again. I am always amazed at how many people mention reading and being interested in these web posts – thanks so much for your interest! I enjoy writing – maybe that could be my next brilliant business plan: I’m no MBA, but I think the premiss of a brilliant business plan is to work really hard doing something you enjoy and not earn too much money, right?

Having said that, we are committing to not working QUITE as hard this summer: we want to get out and enjoy our surroundings – more hiking, biking, and paddling!

This summer we will try to get back to having a life, not just a business!
Sunday, on top of Mount Murry, looking east over the Cariboo Mountain range!

After we cycled out of Denmark with sadness in our hearts, we struck out to cross northern Germany, heading south first, then west (i.e. INTO the wind, always a smart plan on a bike tour) towards The Netherlands. We picked up the trail along the Nord-Ostsee Kanal, (The Kiel Canal) which goes from Kiel on the east side of the northern peninsula that is the northernmost bit of Germany and mainland Denmark to Brunsbuttel on the west side of the peninsula. The canal was built in the late 1800s to open a quicker and easier route for shipping from the North Sea to the Baltic Sea. I wondered out loud to Tim as we approached it if the canal was still used today, and he didn’t know. We soon saw many large ships with big cargo loads moving up and down the canal – I guess the answer is yes! We also saw many many many tall ships heading towards Kiel – there must have been a race or an event of some sort, as we saw tall ships moving in this direction for a few days.

Shipping in the Nord-Ostsee Kanal. (Notice the short-sleeves: this is the only day on our trip it was warm enough to have only one layer on!)
Shipping in the Nord-Ostsee Kanal. (Notice the short-sleeves: this is the only day on our trip it was warm enough to have only one layer on!)

 

Tall ships in the Kanal - the bridges over the canal are 42 m high, allowing ships of 40 m height to pass under!
Tall ships in the Kanal – the bridges over the canal are 42 m high, allowing ships of 40 m height to pass under!

Our plan to cycle along the north coast of Germany was dependant on a four short ferry rides across two rivers, and two bays. When we found out that the first ferry we needed to cross the Elbe River to Cuxhaven was no longer running, this plan started to unravel. We did get across the Elbe after a detour upriver to Gluckstadt, and across the River Weser at Bremerhaven, but the next two ferries weren’t running either. We decided to make a beeline for the Netherlands – the cycling infrastructure in Germany was frustrating us, anyway. After being in Denmark, it was hard work to bump along the rough cycle paths in Germany, and even harder work trying to find signage for cycle routes.

On our way through Bremerhaven to get a ferry across the river to Nordenham, we saw this bakery and of course had to stop and buy some bread!
On our way through Bremerhaven to get the ferry across the River Weser, we saw this bakery and of course had to stop and buy some bread!

 

The city of Leer close to the Netherlands border was super cycling friendly and had this very cool statue at its western edge.
The city of Leer close to the Netherlands border was super cycling-friendly and had this very cool statue at its western edge.

Germany is the land of machines: inner tubes, condoms, mediocre coffee, cigarettes (remember those??), good coffee, and more mediocre coffee. Here are a few:

DSCF6814 DSCF6807 DSCF6806

Stay tuned for more from our trip in the next post…..

One thought on “Back in the Dough

  1. Kate I am sure you could be paid for writing. Travel and cycling magazines, or a book about living where you live. Think Peter Mayles “A year in Provence” or Frances Mayes. You write very well, and your life is interesting.
    Also, there was an interesting article about cargo bikes in RideOn http://www.rideonmagazine.com.au that may inspire Tim (not that he seems to need much). Cheers Jane

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